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Bilingual children have better ‘working memory’ than monolingual children.

Posted in: Blog | April 29, 2013

Bilingual children have better ‘working memory’ than monolingual children, study shows;
children were shown a series of stimuli (frogs) that simultaneously appeared in different points of the screen. When the frogs disappeared, children had to remember the places where they had appeared. (b) The most complex task: stimuli were separetely displayed and children had to remember the place and order on which they had appeared, which is highly demanding in cognitive terms. Credit: University of Granada A study conducted at the University of Granada and the University of York in Toronto, Canada, has revealed that bilingual children develop a better working memory –which holds, processes and updates information over short periods of time– than monolingual children. The working memory plays a major role in the execution of a wide range of activities, such as mental calculation (since we have to remember numbers and operate with them) or reading comprehension (given that it requires associating the successive concepts in a text).

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